Can you help?

As part of its mandate, the Trinity College Archives acquires copies of everything published by the College, and it attempts as well to obtain copies of all student publications, but there are, inevitably, many gaps, particularly before the College's federation with the University of Toronto. The Archivist would like to hear from you if you have any of the following publications, papers, photographs and other materials that show what Trinity was like when you were here.

Trinity College Cricket Team outside Old  Trinity College on Queen Street West, c.1897 (Toronto)
Trinity College Cricket Team outside Old Trinity College on Queen Street West, c.1897. In white blazer: Herbert Clayton Simpson, class of 1900; far left: R. Barrington Nevitt; other team members unidentified. Trinity College Archives, H.C. Simpson fonds, F2147.

Fill in the gaps

Perhaps the most important single record published by the College is its calendar, which lists courses, staff, and academic policies. Not surprisingly, there are gaps in the early years and we lack several calendars and notices published by the Faculty of Medicine and the Trinity Medical School, later the Trinity Medical College. Only a few calendars from the Faculty of Music and St Hilda’s, both of which issued calendars, have survived. Other examples of official publications that are missing are the magazines known to have been published by the Office of Convocation in the 1920 and 1930s, and some annual reports of St Hilda’s College.

Student publications

Student publications are even more problematic. The sets of Rouge et Noir and the Trinity University Review are complete (we think – the numbering of issues is often erratic!), but St. Hilda’s Chronicle has not fared as well: all the issues in its first year (1900-1901) and many in the years that followed before its absorption by the Review in 1940 are missing. Entire  years of Salterrae in the 1950s and 1960s are unavailable.